School-Breakfast-Fuels-Greatness-Edison-School-3.10.15Earlier this week, New England Patriots Safety Duron Harmon, Former New England Patriots Tight End Jermaine Wiggins, Massachusetts dairy farmer Susan Shields and Audrey Rowe of the Food and Nutrition Service at the United States Department of Agriculture visited Thomas A. Edison School in Brighton to get students excited about school breakfast. Fuel Up to Play 60 is the nation’s largest in-school wellness program and has launched a “Fuel Greatness” campaign to mobilize communities to take action and advocate for, and implement, alternative breakfast options in school districts nationwide.

“School breakfast provides students with a solid foundation for learning,” said Wiggins. “It provides the fuel they need to set their day in a positive direction toward success at school which is important each and every day.” “School breakfast is one of the most important things we can offer our students,” said Mary Driscoll, Principal, Thomas A. Edison School. “It is our duty as school leaders to make sure our students have access to healthy foods at school throughout the day. School breakfast is essential to a child’s ability to learn. It’s a tool for success just like books, homework and class time.”

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Students who eat breakfast at school are more likely to succeed in the classroom, and thanks to the Cabot Family Charitable Trust and New England Dairy & Food Council, students at six Boston Public Schools, including the Thomas A. Edison School, are eating a healthy breakfast more often. To help support the expansion of school breakfast in Boston Public Schools, $25,000 in funding was provided by the Trust to New England Dairy & Food Council.

These funds go a long way toward helping students develop healthy behaviors at school that fuel greatness in the classroom and will benefit them for a lifetime” said Katherine S. McHugh, executive director, Cabot Family Charitable Trust.Research demonstrates that good nutrition, including daily breakfast, and increased physical activity can lead to improved academic performance1, but according to one study, more than 60 percent of students do not eat breakfast each day.2 Many kids are showing up to school hungry, and hungry kids may not be able to succeed in the classroom.

“Good nutrition is as critical to a child’s overall success as the curriculum that our schools teach every day,” said Audrey Rowe, the Administrator for the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). “A well-balanced breakfast offers an important nutritional foundation and charts the course for a healthier next generation.”

To learn more about Fuel Greatness, Fuel Up to Play 60, and school breakfast, visit: http://www.fueluptoplay60.com. Join the conversation on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at #FuelGreatness

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